August 27, 2013
Di Maio, Bruno
(Italian Fantaisc Art Painter)
Judith, 2007
oil on canvas
27,3 x 39 inch

Di Maio, Bruno

(Italian Fantaisc Art Painter)

Judith, 2007

oil on canvas

27,3 x 39 inch

March 28, 2013
Ernst Fuchs
( Austrian painter, draftsman, printmaker, sculptor, architect, stage designer, composer, poet, singer and one of the founders of the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism n.1930)
Crucifix, 1950
Watercolor
Viena, Peter Infeld Privatstiftung

Ernst Fuchs

( Austrian painter, draftsman, printmaker, sculptorarchitect, stage designer, composerpoetsinger and one of the founders of the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism n.1930)

Crucifix, 1950

Watercolor

Viena, Peter Infeld Privatstiftung

October 23, 2011
darkface:
I See You by ~BLACC360

darkface:

I See You by ~BLACC360

(via april-to-infinity)

October 15, 2011
fuckyeahpsychedelics:

“The Universe” by liberate-the-spirit

fuckyeahpsychedelics:

“The Universe” by liberate-the-spirit

(via thelookingglassgallery)

October 15, 2011
 Art by Zhang Xiaogang, 1958
A Big Family, 1995
Oil on canvas
179 x 229 cm
Inspired by family photos from the Cultural Revolution period, as well as the European tradition of surrealism, Zhang Xiaogang’s paintings engage with the notion of identity within the Chinese culture of collectivism. Basing his work around the concept of ‘family’ –immediate, extended, and societal – Xiaogang’s portraits depict an endless genealogy of imagined forebears and progenitors, each unnervingly similar and distinguished by minute difference. Often painted in black and white, Xiaogang’s portraits translate the language of photography into paint. Drawing from the generic quality of formal photo studio poses and greyscale palette, Xiaogang’s figures are nameless and timeless: a series of individual histories represented within the strict confines of formula. The occasional splotches of colour which interrupt his images create aberrant demarcations, reminiscent of birth marks, aged film, social stigma, or a lingering sense of the sitter’s self assertion. Incorporating the aesthetic of traditional Chinese charcoal drawing, Xiaogang’s style wavers between the exaggeration of animation and stoic flatness. Muted and compliant, Xiaogang’s extended family convey individual identity through their unalterable physical features: too big heads, tiny hands, long noses, and subtle alterations in hairstyle give clues to intimate characteristics and stifled emotions. These dream-like distortions give a complex psychological dimension to Xiaogang’s work, heightening the tension of regulated claustrophobia, and initiating suggestive narrative readings.

 Art by Zhang Xiaogang, 1958

A Big Family, 1995

Oil on canvas

179 x 229 cm

Inspired by family photos from the Cultural Revolution period, as well as the European tradition of surrealism, Zhang Xiaogang’s paintings engage with the notion of identity within the Chinese culture of collectivism. Basing his work around the concept of ‘family’ –immediate, extended, and societal – Xiaogang’s portraits depict an endless genealogy of imagined forebears and progenitors, each unnervingly similar and distinguished by minute difference. 

Often painted in black and white, Xiaogang’s portraits translate the language of photography into paint. Drawing from the generic quality of formal photo studio poses and greyscale palette, Xiaogang’s figures are nameless and timeless: a series of individual histories represented within the strict confines of formula. The occasional splotches of colour which interrupt his images create aberrant demarcations, reminiscent of birth marks, aged film, social stigma, or a lingering sense of the sitter’s self assertion. 

Incorporating the aesthetic of traditional Chinese charcoal drawing, Xiaogang’s style wavers between the exaggeration of animation and stoic flatness. Muted and compliant, Xiaogang’s extended family convey individual identity through their unalterable physical features: too big heads, tiny hands, long noses, and subtle alterations in hairstyle give clues to intimate characteristics and stifled emotions. These dream-like distortions give a complex psychological dimension to Xiaogang’s work, heightening the tension of regulated claustrophobia, and initiating suggestive narrative readings.

September 23, 2011
Art by Jacques Resch, 1946
Le diabolo
Oil on canvas

Art by Jacques Resch, 1946

Le diabolo

Oil on canvas

September 21, 2011

lucesdraconis:

Oh, good. I’ve always preferred the “cool” Kaito to the “goofy” one. But that’s probably because the goofy one doesn’t tend to make for pretty pictures I can stare at for an hour.

(via april-to-infinity)

September 18, 2011
bookspaperscissors:

Archibald dreams of books

bookspaperscissors:

Archibald dreams of books

(Source: sosuperawesome, via mistyconcept)

September 15, 2011
Art by Rudolf Hausner , (1914 - 1995)
Malarz, 1980.
Oil on canvas

A major Austrian painter and printmaker, Rudolf Hausner studied art at the Academy in Vienna from 1931 to 1936, under Fahringer and Sterrer. Many of his early paintings were confiscated and branded as ‘degenerate’ by the ruling Nazi party in 1938. In 1941 Hausner was drafted by the German army and remained a soldier until the war’s end in 1945. After the war he returned to Vienna and immersed himself in studies dealing with the unconscious and with the art of Surrealists, particularly that of Max Ernst. Along with Wolfgang Hutter and Anton Lehmden, Rudolf Hausner founded the Viennese School of Fantastic Realism in 1947. During the 1950s and 1960s this became one of Austria’s most important movements and Hausner was its most influential artist. During this time he also held principal teaching posts at the academies of Vienna and Hamburg.
Equally gifted as a painter, lithographer and etcher, Hausner’s complex art is based upon potent symbols and imagery. Primary among these is the constantly recurring image of the first man, Adam, who is part autobiographical and part archetype. Another compelling image is that of the man or boy in a sailor’s cap. Hausner claimed that this image symbolized the myth of Odysseus and his epic voyages on the seas. It also, however, is representative of the artist’s own boyhood and the integrated relationships of youth and age within the self.

Art by Rudolf Hausner , (1914 - 1995)

Malarz, 1980.

Oil on canvas

A major Austrian painter and printmaker, Rudolf Hausner studied art at the Academy in Vienna from 1931 to 1936, under Fahringer and Sterrer. Many of his early paintings were confiscated and branded as ‘degenerate’ by the ruling Nazi party in 1938. In 1941 Hausner was drafted by the German army and remained a soldier until the war’s end in 1945. After the war he returned to Vienna and immersed himself in studies dealing with the unconscious and with the art of Surrealists, particularly that of Max Ernst. Along with Wolfgang Hutter and Anton Lehmden, Rudolf Hausner founded the Viennese School of Fantastic Realism in 1947. During the 1950s and 1960s this became one of Austria’s most important movements and Hausner was its most influential artist. During this time he also held principal teaching posts at the academies of Vienna and Hamburg.

Equally gifted as a painter, lithographer and etcher, Hausner’s complex art is based upon potent symbols and imagery. Primary among these is the constantly recurring image of the first man, Adam, who is part autobiographical and part archetype. Another compelling image is that of the man or boy in a sailor’s cap. Hausner claimed that this image symbolized the myth of Odysseus and his epic voyages on the seas. It also, however, is representative of the artist’s own boyhood and the integrated relationships of youth and age within the self.

September 3, 2011
Art by John Hathway
John Hathway is an awesome Japanese freelance artist who is doing multilateral creative activities by fusing scientific technology, theory and 3D designs.
John Hathway graduated master’s course of Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo in 2004. He went on to doctoral course of the same graduate school as above and concurrently served as special researcher of Society for the Promotion of Science.(Major is physics: Quantum extreme physics)

Art by John Hathway

John Hathway is an awesome Japanese freelance artist who is doing multilateral creative activities by fusing scientific technology, theory and 3D designs.

John Hathway graduated master’s course of Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo in 2004. He went on to doctoral course of the same graduate school as above and concurrently served as special researcher of Society for the Promotion of Science.(Major is physics: Quantum extreme physics)

September 1, 2011
Art by Carlos Barahona Possollo (1967)
Self Portrait, 2003
Oil on canvas

Art by Carlos Barahona Possollo (1967)

Self Portrait, 2003

Oil on canvas

August 31, 2011
Sergey Tyukanov (1955)
Flying Bottle, 2006
Oil on canvas
“Each person has his or her own idea of the world. Pictures are the window to the world of the artist, who has an opportunity to create things that are impossible in the real world.  My world is the world of the metamorphosis and paradox, which are reality for me, and this reality I materialize in my works. I like to be surprised and astonished, I like to surprise and astonish myself.”

Sergey Tyukanov (1955)

Flying Bottle, 2006

Oil on canvas

“Each person has his or her own idea of the world. Pictures are the window to the world of the artist, who has an opportunity to create things that are impossible in the real world.  My world is the world of the metamorphosis and paradox, which are reality for me, and this reality I materialize in my works. I like to be surprised and astonished, I like to surprise and astonish myself.”

August 30, 2011

Corner House
by Hungarian painter István Orosz (b. 1951).
“Illusion,” wrote Oscar Wilde, “is the first of all pleasures.”

Corner House

by Hungarian painter István Orosz (b. 1951).

“Illusion,” wrote Oscar Wilde, “is the first of all pleasures.”

August 30, 2011
Art by Paula Rego (1935)
Swallows the Poisoned Apple, 1995
Oil on canvas

Art by Paula Rego (1935)

Swallows the Poisoned Apple, 1995

Oil on canvas

August 29, 2011
Bruno di Maio (1944)
The Wine Press, 2006
Oil on canvas

Bruno di Maio (1944)

The Wine Press, 2006

Oil on canvas

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